DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL HISTORY

http:departmentofnaturalhistory.com

(via Anthropocene: is this the new epoch of humans? | Science | The Guardian)

wnycradiolab:

Undulatus asperatus are coming to get you.

(via npr)

npr:

Prehistoric cave paintings of animals and human hands in Indonesia are as ancient as similar paintings found in Western Europe, according to a new study that suggests humans may have carried this art tradition with them when they migrated out of Africa.

Indonesian Cave Paintings As Old As Europe’s Ancient Art

Photo Credit: Kinza Riza/Courtesy of Nature.com

sounddoe:

Alexis Vasilikos

Clouds crashing in the sky

jkottke:

There’s an incredible 16-second sequence in this video of clouds, starting at around 10 seconds in. It looks as though the sky is a roiling ocean wave about to crash on the beach. I’ve watched it approximately 90 times so far today.

It’s worth making the video fullscreen and pumping it up to the max quality (2160p!) to see it properly. (via colossal)

npr:

A new study reports that plants enhance the workplace. They cheer people up and they seem to improve air quality and concentration. According to one researcher, adding plants to a workspace served to increase workers’ productivity by 15 percent.

Growing Business — Show Us Your Desk Plant

So, what’s the most productive thing to do while scrolling through Tumblr at work today? Sharing a picture of your desk plant in our comments section, of course.

-Kate

(via Meteorite makes big crater in Nicaragua - CNN.com)

smithsonianlibraries:

This is Martha, the last Passenger Pigeon. She died on September 1, 1914 in the Cincinnati Zoo. Shortly thereafter, her body was packed in ice and sent by railroad to Washington, DC, to become a part of the National Museum of Natural History’s collection as a lasting legacy of the harm that can be done to the natural world by humans. Just decades prior, the Passenger Pigeon was the most abundant bird in North America. The disappearance of the species helped ignite the modern conservation movement.

For the Centennial of her death, Martha was recently brought out for display and is currently on view in the exhibition Once There Were Billions, Vanished Birds of North America. Sponsored by the Smithsonian Libraries in partnership with the National Museum of Natural History and the Biodiversity Heritage Library, the exhibition tells the story of the last Passenger Pigeon, a member of a species that once numbered in the billions, along with the disappearance of the Great Auk, Carolina Parakeet, and Heath Hen. These extinctions reveal the fragile connections between species and their environment. 

The Smithsonian Libraries, National Museum of Natural History, and the Biodiversity Heritage Library will be hosting a Twitter Chat on September 2, 2014 from 2-3 pm Eastern Time. This is your chance to ask questions about the Passenger Pigeon, extinction, and biodiversity literature.

Follow @SILibraries, @NMNH, and @BioDivLibrary and use the hashtag #Martha100 to tweet your questions.

(via npr)

http://vedur2.mogt.is/grimsfjall/webcam/

Should You Fear the Pizzly Bear? - NYTimes.com

(via Rosetta Spacecraft Arrives At Comet After 10-Year Chase : The Two-Way : NPR)

plantonpremises:

Rubber plant (Ficus elastica) at 1 HR. Cleaners & Tailor Shop

badluckhotrocks:

Specimen from the conscience pile at the Petrified Forest National Park.

(via badluckhotrocks)

cavetocanvas:

Giuseppe Penone, Tree of 12 Metres, 1980–2

From the Tate Gallery:

Tree of 12 Metres was made by scraping away the wood from a felled tree, which had first been roughly sawn into a beam, to reveal its internal structure of narrow core and developing branches. Penone’s aim was to return the tree to the form it had had at an earlier stage of its growth, making visible natural processes which are normally hidden. He made the first of his Albero or Tree works in 1969. In 1970 two Trees of 12 Metres were made as performances in the Moderna Museet, Stockholm, and at the Aktionsraum, Munich. These early Trees were still partially attached to the industrially-sawn beams into which they had disappeared and from which they now emerged like sculptural reliefs. In this semi-emergent state they were supported horizontally or propped diagonally against the wall in the space in which they were exhibited. With experience, Penone was able to work on increasingly thicker beams which contained the tree’s entire core and to cut all the background support away, freeing the tree’s centre so that it could stand vertically on its own. In the early 1980s he began to leave short lengths of the beams untouched to provide free-standing bases, from which the forms of the younger trees arise. In this version of the Tree of 12 Metresthe artist has left top and bottom ends still trapped inside the beam. A cut at the vertical mid-point has converted it into two pieces, each of which stands on a base formed by the remnant of the beam. The top part of the tree is thus inverted.

(via shawncreeden)

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